From Obeya to wallpaper show room

When visual management turns into useless wallpaper

Having an Obeya is the latest – fashionable – sign an organization takes Lean seriously. The name itself sounds performing as is it is so strongly related to Lean.

Obeya may sound both exotic and performing, but is nothing more than a “big room”.

(I assume the perplexed Japanese are too polite to ask why so many westerners get jumpy when getting a big room.)

The bigger the room the longer the walls that call for something to display. And in order to make the obeya impressive, especially to visitors, lots of graphs, figures, tables, drawings, photos and maps must be displayed. So shall it be.

As a matter of fact, many companies display impressive walls clad of the previously mentioned printed material, plus sticky notes and hand colored symbols.

Well, many and most of the obeyas I’ve seen fail to turn to the war room where smart decisions are made to win the never ending battle against the empire of waste and its dreaded sneaky saboteurs named muda, mura and muri.

Getting closer to the display, it takes the outsider a while to find out the meaning of what is shown. I didn’t expect the pride about achievements to be that discreet, but it turns out, once the code for reading the charts has been broken, that the pride and achievement are still to come. Anytime soon suggests the presenter.

Not seldom are the prints totally outdated, and latest manual inputs (a place is left for them) missing. Key performance indicators graphs are plotted without any mention of unit nor indication of the target. Some data tables or audit sheets show the period between two events, confirming the lack of cadence.

Actions plans are anything but that. Fluffy wording is used to describe problems and even more fuzzy ones to describe the actions to take. The department in charge are mentioned together with a date (never know if it is the date the information is pushed to this department or the expected date of problem resolution), but nothing to track the actor’s acknowledgment, results nor to check off the action as successful.

The latest obeya with long walls full of complicated looking graphs and lots of other information turned out to be a kind of wall of shame, bluntly displaying and confirming what was happening on the nearby shopfloor. With time lag though.

Nevertheless, those obeyas just as the successful ones, set the scene for ritual meetings where the poor performances are “discussed” without many convincing decisions taken. My colleague describes those rooms as places where people shout at each other, standing.

Now, when I am invited to visit the Obeya, I expect to see visual management turned into useless wallpaper and the dedicated war room turned into a pathetic wallpaper showroom.

To end this post with a more optimistic tone, I assume I am only called to places in trouble and those working well simply do not need me.


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My takeaways from Breakthrough Project Management conference

Paris, October 17th, 2016. Ian Heptinstall, co-author of “The Executive Guide to Breakthrough Project Management, Capital & Construction Projects on-time in less time, on budget at lower cost without compromise” (full title), was there to deliver his conference on the subject.

Before you turn away thinking this has nothing to do with my industry, you should ask yourself if yours too struggles to deliver on time, in full, on budget. If yes, the ideas shared in this conference should be of interest, whatever your trade is.

Ian’s claim is to introduce a way to deliver in less time and less budget, without compromising on scope, quality and risks, no longer trading off.

The conference

The time indications are related to the video

Many project managers do not realize their projects go wrong, but several studies show that most (capex) projects do not fulfil their requirements (2:26). Ian goes through the major reasons at macro and micro level for projects to miss all their targets. Three issues are found at the heart of the problem (8:10); the way to contract, the way to plan and the way to execute.

Ian, together with co-author Robert Bolton, believe they’ve found an easy, repeatable and sustainable way to overcome these issues. The shift from traditional project management to Breakthrough Project Management is presented from 10:00.

Among the things to change is the methodology shift to Critical Chain Project Management (CCPM) briefly introduced at 14:32. The project’s monitoring Fever Chart is explained at 22:20. The proven CCPM methodology will face a major obstacle: the way of contracting and purchase (26:06).

The new way to consider contracting is introduced at 29:16 and starts with the issues related to fixed pricing. For instance, complex problems involving high-tech or some new technology are tricky to estimate in terms of costs. Second, buyers want to have fixed prices. Contractors subcontract and ask for fixed prices as well. The buyer is usually the winner on the expenses of the contractor.

Instead of a hierarchy of contractors, the new approach promotes alliancing, i.e. putting stakeholders in a single team aligned onto a common goal and paid in the same way: “cost-fixed-variable” (34:17). Cost are expenses to be covered, without markup. The fees are fixed and variable and not related to costs. The only way for the partners to make more money once the project is started is to get the variable fees, thus have a successful project. What the success is made of is left to the client to decide: time, quality, safety.. This changes the team members behaviors.

The characteristics of project alliances are summarized at 37:45. Project alliancing does not mean the bidding is not competitively sourced (39:10).

The conference summary is presented at 39:50.

My takeaways

The whole conference is presented in a lively way, with some funny and true everyday’s examples of the ridiculous requirements or expectations in traditional project management. It makes the conference anything but boring!

Being knowledgeable about Critical Chain Project Management (CCPM), it is not the CCPM discovery that raised my interest, but the simple way Ian presented it. It is consistent with the book’s aim: being an executive guide, thus give concise necessary insight and explanation, without boring the audience.

Alliancing was new to me and raised my interest, reminding the issues I’ve seen with the usual hierarchical buyer-supplier relationship.

Finally, I’ve found the whole conference (content and presentation) worth a post to promote it. I hope it will do.

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Samples from LTP training with Bill Dettmer (Day 1)

Paris, June 2016. Bill Dettmer delivers his 6-day Logical Thinking Process training course in our offices. I am attending on the host’s and partner’s side, going through the whole course for the second time (I got my certificate the previous year) as a backup facilitator-if-needed, a master of ceremony, reporter and videographer.

While Bill is sharing his knowledge and experience, I videotape with his consent in order to promote the course and show you samples of what happens during the 6 days.

The following video shows samples of the morning of the first day, once introductions have been made, backgrounds, expectations and motivations of attendants shared.

I am sorry for the poor image quality due to low light, but this is a tradeoff between sharing the experience with the viewers and bothering the course attendants who paid for their seat.

The first morning is spent on some basic theory about the logical relationships, the structure of the different logical trees and how to build them. It paves the way for the afternoon’s exercise in which each participant builds his/her own Goal Tree, then, in turns, presents it to others and have it scrutinized by the others, under Bill’s supervision and coaching.


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The Executive Guide to Breakthrough Project Management – Book Review

The Executive Guide to Breakthrough Project Management is about combining Critical Chain Project Management and “alliancing” or collaborative contracting for a win-win efficient way to manage huge (or small) construction projects.

Soon when reading the guide, it becomes obvious that what the authors describe as efficient in construction and capex projects can be used in many other trades.

Watch the author’s conference

When enough is… enough

cho-in-azoneThis is a behavior I’ve noticed quite often in food industry, in chemical or pharmaceutical plants: cleaning and sanitation processes (mainly their duration) are extended beyond the standard procedures at the expense of costs and production capacity.

Fear of harming

In the regulatory-constraint industries like food, chemical or pharma, people on shopfloor are trained and qualified to perform cleaning and sanitation operations. They follow procedures and work instructions, based on standards.

They usually also have frequent training about the importance of sanitation or sterilization and the possible consequences if badly done. Working in food, healthcare or pharma is embracing the sacred mission to bring something good, to cure or relieve customers and/or patients and do everything to prevent hurting them in any way.

They are also reminded what consequences for the organization in case of problem beyond failing to: losing the customers’/patients trust, losing the licence to produce, being sued, being exposed to scandals…scary enough for shopfloor people to take things seriously.

Yet the people on shopfloor seldom have the scientific background to fully understand what is required for good sanitation or sterilization, when doing more is useless or even counterproductive. They also are often left on their own, without expert supervisors to reassure them, answer possible question or take decisions in case of doubt.

Furthermore, the results of sanitation/sterilization is most often only known after a sample of rinsing water or the swabbing of the tool/equipment has been analyzed by some remote lab.

Fearing to harm the organization, or worse the customers / patients or possibly to have to go over the whole lengthy sanitation process again if it is not satisfactory, the sanitation is performed longer than procedures require it. This is base on the belief the more the better.

This seemingly logical and well-intentioned assumption is never challenged, leading to waste detergents, acids, water… and time, simply because over-sanitation is not noticed by management.

Changeovers are even longer

Changeovers in such environments can be long and painstaking due to regulatory constraints and all the paperwork associated. Ignoring the over-sanitation habits can extend the changeover duration even more.

Besides adding costs for no additional value, the additional time spent on sanitation may be needed on critical equipment (bottlenecks) and the time lost will not only never be recovered but the true cost is to be counted in minutes of turnover. And this one can be skyrocketing!

Conclusion

When looking for additional productive capacity or a way to get more out of the current process, check the changeovers’ content and take a closer look on sanitation.

Give the shopfloor personnel clear indication when enough is enough, without risk to harm anybody nor to endanger quality. If necessary, have a real qualified subject matter expert attending these critical phases, ready to support the team and answer any question.

Not only will it take some concerns off the team, but may be a great payback in terms of additional yield.


Feel free to share your thoughts and experience in the comments and share the post if you liked it.

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Do what you can, with what you’ve got, where you are

This quote, often falsely attributed to Theodore Roosevelt (see Sue Brewton’s blog), is an excellent mantra for both personal and management use.

Too often when facing a problem or a challenge, individuals tend to push it to others, to complain about their insufficient resources and have great ideas for others instead. Think about the latest cost reduction program for instance.

>lisez moi en français

With the “Do what you can, with what you’ve got, where you are” mantra in mind when facing a problem or a challenge, the right approach should be:

  • What can I do by myself? What is in my hand? What actions are within my scope of authority / autonomy, what can I decide / engage / implement by myself?
  • With the means at my disposal, what can I do? How far can I go and is it enough to achieve the goal? What do I really need more to achieve the goal?
  • From my position in the organization, what can I do? What can I decide? What can I influence?

Here are 3 situations the mantra can be great for.

1. Facing one’s fears

These questions should be part of a personal routine and a mental checklist. Especially when facing a scary or challenging situation, going through the questions shifts the focus from emotional perceptions to factual assessment.

There is probably more that can be done than instinctively perceived, so in order not to give up too fast, remembering the mantra guides to an inventory of possible options.

We could double the mantra by another maxim I’ve found in General George S. Patton’s memoirs: “Do not take counsel of your fears.”

2. Facing the boss

When discussing a problem or a challenge with the boss, the quick inventory of personal possibilities avoids disappointing him/her with a list of reasons why the problem is very tough to solve or the goal out of reach, with request for more means or with suggestions for others to act instead.

Only when one’s capabilities, available means or one’s position in the organization are truly insufficient to solve the problem or achieve the goal, the limitations of all possible current options should be fed back to the boss.

3. Facing subordinates

On the other side a manager who sees a direct report trying to escape his/her duty, demanding more resources or offering great ideas for others, the rephrasing is easy:

  • I ask YOU to do what YOU can do
  • I ask YOU to do with the resources YOU have
  • I ask YOU to consider the options YOU have from YOUr position in YOUr perimeter

Conclusion

“Do what you can, with what you’ve got, where you are” is easy to remember, holds a lot of calm confidence and wisdom and can come handy in several situations.

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The man-machine system performance

When looking for performance improvement of a man-machine system, too often management puts emphasis onto machine or technology at large, ignoring the fact that humans associated with equipment, machines or technology form an interrelated system and consequently humans are the discriminating factor.

The fallacy of trusting the latest technology

There is a strong belief, backed up by vendor’s marketing, that the latest state-of-the-art high-tech equipment will bring a breakthrough in performance. This is welcome news for executives struggling to keep their organization up with competition and seeking a significant performance uplift.

Production managers, industrial engineers or system designers are big kids loving high-tech expensive toys, geeks of their own kind and dreaming to get the latest, biggest, fastest piece of equipment.

Once investment made, performance does not skyrocket though.

What happened?

Management blindness

Management ignored the human factor, i.e. people put in front or in charge of the new machine, the latest technology. An operator and his machine for instance are a system.

The overall performance of this system is determined by the human-machine pair, and guess what, the most variable and hardest to control is the human factor.

Unlike machines, humans have their moods, their worries, variable health and morale, private concerns and motivation issues. One day fine, the other day down.

Humans are not equal in competencies and skills. Some learn fast, some learn slow and some never really get it.

So what’s the point giving the latest top-notch technology to someone not competent or not motivated?

Yet this is most often what happens. Management assumes that the best of machines will make the difference, totally ignoring the influence of the people in charge.

The irresistible appeal of technology

Most decision makers and managers have some kind of hard-science background, got their degrees in engineering or business management. They were taught the robustness of math, the beauty of straightforward logic and to trust only facts and data.

When puzzled facing in real-life the highly variable and elusive nature of humans, they have a natural tendency to prefer hardware. This is something that can be put into equations and eventually controlled. This is what they are most familiar with or at least the most at ease with.

Humans are only trouble. No equation helps to understand their intrinsic drivers nor to reduce their variabilities. This is all about soft skills and psychological factors. Nothing for engineers and hard science-minded people.

Instead, they put a strong hope that the best and latest technology will trump the human factor, reduce it to a neglectable pain. But this never happens.

So again: what’s the point giving the latest top-notch technology to someone not competent or not motivated?

Leveraging performance

In order to improve a man-machine system, it is key to first have a look on the human factor, the most important one. Make sure competency is granted. If someone lacks the necessary competencies, performance is nothing than a matter of luck.

Beware of incompetent but highly motivated people though. In their desire to do well, they may have unknowingly potentially dangerous behaviours and/or take bad decisions. These motivated ones are likely to learn, do thing right but need training and guidance.

Not motivated incompetents are not likely to take any initiatives. They are the manager’s pain and burden and giving them better, faster machines won’t help. What’s worse with not motivated incompetents is passive aggressive behaviors that can lead to potentially dangerous situations as well.

Competent but not motivated people need and probably deserve management’s attention in order to get them into the winning quadrant of the competency-motivation matrix, aka skill-will matrix (top right).

There are the competent and motivated people who do their job effectively, often efficiently and without bothering anybody.

Competent Find a driver or a whip No worries
Incompetent Long way to go… Potentially dangerous good will
Not motivated Motivated

Competency-motivation matrix from a supervisor perspective

It is with these competent and motivated people that the limits of machines or technology can be found, as they will use them properly and purposely. Even when these performance limits are reached, it’s not certain that better planning and/or better organization cannot get more performance out of the system.

Think about quick changeovers and all capacity that can be regained applying SMED methodology, or rethinking maintenance in Total Productive Maintenance (TPM) style.

Wrapping up

When facing the challenge for improving performance, considering the way operations are done should be the first step. The second is to remember than investing in people is usually cheaper and more effective than investing in technology in first place, because a well utilized outdated machine will have better yield and be way cheaper than a poorly utilized state-of-the-art new one.

“Unfortunately” for tech-lovers who would prefer new “toys”, this investment in humans has to be a substantial part of their manager’s daily routine.


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Where I could have used a Goal Tree but didn’t know about the tool then

During the June 2016 Logical Thinking Process alumni reunion, Bill Dettmer asked the participants to share their “War Stories”, i.e. experience with the Logical Thinking Process (LTP) and LTP tools.
I came up with several short stories. In this excerpt, I recall I could have used a Goal Tree but didn’t know the tool at that time.

The story I tell is the one that inspired my post Goal tree chronicles – The pharma plant.

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