Future of Lean and additive manufacturing

In a previous post titled “How much non-added value additive manufacturing can take out of actual processes?” my prospective thinking was all about technological disruptions and the impact on companies. The same question is valid for the future of Lean. If as I assume much of the non-added value can be taken out of actual … Continue reading Future of Lean and additive manufacturing

How lean can help shaping the future – compact factories

The factory of the future has to comply with several constraints, among which the energy efficiency and respect of environment, the latter meaning nature as well as neighborhood. Factories of the future will probably be close to housing areas, not only because in some areas space is scarce but because commuting is a major source … Continue reading How lean can help shaping the future – compact factories

How much non-added value additive manufacturing can take out of actual processes?

It is a well-known fact: the sequence of all activities required to bring a product to a customer is called a value stream and despite the name, value does not flow smoothly nor swiftly along streamlined processes. Value streams are cluttered with non-added value processes, tasks and steps, so-called wastes. Traditional manufacturing processes aren’t very … Continue reading How much non-added value additive manufacturing can take out of actual processes?

Will 3D printing revitalize strategic analysis?

It seems to me that in the last decades strategic analysis focused mainly on monitoring new entrants from low-cost countries, struggling with competitors and entering emerging countries’ markets. Compared to Michael Porter’s model of five forces, the above takes care about two at best; Threat of new entrants and intensity of competitive rivalry. Reminder of … Continue reading Will 3D printing revitalize strategic analysis?

Michael Porter’s five forces (video)

In several past posts related to additive manufacturing / 3D printing I mentioned Michael Porter’s five forces model, its real name being The Five Competitive Forces That Shape Strategy. In this post, I pay credit to Mr Porter and let himself explain what the five forces are. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mYF2_FBCvXw You may also like a brief video … Continue reading Michael Porter’s five forces (video)

Creativity breaks loose from constraints with additive manufacturing

New additive manufacturing technologies – let’s take 3D printing as symbol for them – are freeing designers from constraints that came with traditional manufacturing and the assembly methods. Additive manufacturing means adding layer of material after layer instead of cutting out material from a bigger raw chunk, allowing the design of complex and odd shapes … Continue reading Creativity breaks loose from constraints with additive manufacturing

3D Printing and Porter’s five forces – opportunities

In a previous post on this topic I highlighted the threats of 3D printing – as symbol of any additive manufacturing technology – disrupting traditional businesses, wondering if threatened business owners and professionals are aware of it. In this post I’ll take the opposite point of view, as a challenger to established businesses, breaking the … Continue reading 3D Printing and Porter’s five forces – opportunities

3D Printing and Porter’s five forces

In a previous post on this topic I wondered about the pace of announcement of new amazing possibilities offered by 3D printing. I also wonder how the potential disruptions of 3D printing are ignored or underestimated. With the new techniques and new printable materials, virtually anyone can become a manufacturer. While this is good news … Continue reading 3D Printing and Porter’s five forces

Online community connects 3D printer owners with people who need prosthetic hands

Gigaom

Around the world, there are people who have lost all or part of their hand, or were born without one. There are also people and institutions with 3D printers. Pair the two, and you can print a custom mechanical hand for $20-150 — thousands less than the typical prosthetic.

e-NABLE, which functions through a website, Facebook page and Google+ page, stepped up to connect the two after site founder Jon Schull came across work by American prop maker Ivan Owen, who made a metal mechanical hand for South African carpenter Richard Van As. Van As had lost four of his fingers in a carpentry accident.

Owen was then contacted by a mother whose 5-year-old son needed a hand. He again made a metal hand for the boy. But then he turned to 3D printing. MakerBot gave both Owen and Van As a 3D printer.

The pair developed…

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