How sound logical thinking improves fishbone diagrams

Fishbone diagram is known by different names: Ishikawa diagram, cause-and-effect analysis or cause-and-effect diagram. Fishbone diagrams are popular on shop floors as they are easy to understand visual tools. The principle of a fishbone diagram is to list all possible causes leading to an effect (usually the problem to solve) and to sort them into … Continue reading How sound logical thinking improves fishbone diagrams

Could Six Sigma have more harmed than helped?

I started my career in the heyday of Total Quality Management (TQM) in France, beginning of the 1980’s and witnessed over the following years how the TQM trainings and deployments built a quality-aware culture in the companies and spread to everyday’s life. Over time though, other “Japanese Methods” became fashionable and the hype was on … Continue reading Could Six Sigma have more harmed than helped?

Problem solving: what was the last change?

This post could be a sequel of “Yeah, problem solving” in which I used Peter Senge’s quote: “Today’s problems come from yesterday’s solutions”. Quite often people we consultants meet are puzzled by a problem they can’t understand: a reliable process or machine suddenly seems out of control, steady performance dropped unexpectedly and with no apparent … Continue reading Problem solving: what was the last change?

ToC, Lean, Six Sigma and the fourth industrial revolution

According to its promoters, the fourth industrial revolution (Industry 4.0) will bring big changes and re-boost industry in Western Europe with the integration of digital technologies in smart resources and connected objects. Embedded smart technologies will free the future processes from some human weaknesses and limitations, if not from human attendance. With less needs for … Continue reading ToC, Lean, Six Sigma and the fourth industrial revolution