When enough is… enough

cho-in-azoneThis is a behavior I’ve noticed quite often in food industry, in chemical or pharmaceutical plants: cleaning and sanitation processes (mainly their duration) are extended beyond the standard procedures at the expense of costs and production capacity.

Fear of harming

In the regulatory-constraint industries like food, chemical or pharma, people on shopfloor are trained and qualified to perform cleaning and sanitation operations. They follow procedures and work instructions, based on standards.

They usually also have frequent training about the importance of sanitation or sterilization and the possible consequences if badly done. Working in food, healthcare or pharma is embracing the sacred mission to bring something good, to cure or relieve customers and/or patients and do everything to prevent hurting them in any way.

They are also reminded what consequences for the organization in case of problem beyond failing to: losing the customers’/patients trust, losing the licence to produce, being sued, being exposed to scandals…scary enough for shopfloor people to take things seriously.

Yet the people on shopfloor seldom have the scientific background to fully understand what is required for good sanitation or sterilization, when doing more is useless or even counterproductive. They also are often left on their own, without expert supervisors to reassure them, answer possible question or take decisions in case of doubt.

Furthermore, the results of sanitation/sterilization is most often only known after a sample of rinsing water or the swabbing of the tool/equipment has been analyzed by some remote lab.

Fearing to harm the organization, or worse the customers / patients or possibly to have to go over the whole lengthy sanitation process again if it is not satisfactory, the sanitation is performed longer than procedures require it. This is base on the belief the more the better.

This seemingly logical and well-intentioned assumption is never challenged, leading to waste detergents, acids, water… and time, simply because over-sanitation is not noticed by management.

Changeovers are even longer

Changeovers in such environments can be long and painstaking due to regulatory constraints and all the paperwork associated. Ignoring the over-sanitation habits can extend the changeover duration even more.

Besides adding costs for no additional value, the additional time spent on sanitation may be needed on critical equipment (bottlenecks) and the time lost will not only never be recovered but the true cost is to be counted in minutes of turnover. And this one can be skyrocketing!

Conclusion

When looking for additional productive capacity or a way to get more out of the current process, check the changeovers’ content and take a closer look on sanitation.

Give the shopfloor personnel clear indication when enough is enough, without risk to harm anybody nor to endanger quality. If necessary, have a real qualified subject matter expert attending these critical phases, ready to support the team and answer any question.

Not only will it take some concerns off the team, but may be a great payback in terms of additional yield.


Feel free to share your thoughts and experience in the comments and share the post if you liked it.

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